do flies fly, do ducks duck – do muses muse? an authorial guide to an authorial myth…

Hello again, and welcome (back).

I was going to write a piece about smoking for this post, given that cigarettes play something of a prominent role both in my debut novel, Wood, Talc and Mr. J: We never had it so good, and its sequel, Nancy Boy: for one year only…

… but then I wasn’t quite sure what I wanted to say about them, about cigarettes, at least this time around, other than the fact they’re bad for you, and you possibly know that already…

And so, this time around, I’d simply like to offer my opinion on that old authors’ bugaboo: ‘writers’ block’ – I can already hear you: ‘’Been done! Boring. The irony: Chris is writing about writers’ block because he’s totally uninspired – Tell us something about cigarettes!’

And you may well be right. For, at the end of the day, all I would like to say about it – well, there’s a clue in the above paragraph, where you’ll notice I placed my first mention of the ‘ailment’ in inverted commas, as I’ve just done again, there, with ‘ailment’. Why? Because there’s no such thing as ‘writers’ block’, but a mere whim amongst authors, an attention seeker – How I suffer for my art! I was a genius, and now I’m a fraud!

Thank God, then, for writers’ block! The ignorant masses – you know, the non-authors out there – those doing real work, they buy it, ’works like a charm.

And so it goes, as somebody once said.

‘What, then, Chris, might we attribute to the state of being uninspired?’

In a word: fatigue. In another: tiredness. In another – okay, I’ll make it two: mental exhaustion.

Prescription: go and do something else – a change is as good as a rest!

‘And for how long?’

As long as required – how long is a piece of string?

Writing is a consequence  the byproduct, you might say – of a head-full of knowledge, which is subconsciously working away, formulating your art, whilst ever you, the author, are engaged in other activities, like taking your kids to school, playing badminton on Thursday, and on, each activity fuelling the mind with creativity… save that, on some days, attempting to force it out , the creative process, before it’s ripe, can have the adverse effect…

No, I won’t go on, but to say that this has been my experience since I’ve been ‘putting pen to paper’, particularly with the above novels.

The sequel to the sequel, incidentally, is making progress: The Battle of Hastings – the third in the Rowlings Years series. And my policy of taking a break when it isn’t there is working a treat.

But here’s what inspired this post, thus confirming my philosophy, you may want to call it: earlier today, again basking in a week away from the ‘pen’, I was lying in the bath whilst my beautiful other half sat on the side of it. We were chatting, about how we arrived where we are today, and via many an adventure, I’m very happy to say – I wouldn’t have had it any other way; did you know that swords actually evolve into pens if you survive? Anyhow, what evolved from this conversation was my mental formulation of the fourth book in the Rowlings Years series: Two Big Bags and a Guitar…

How about that!

It’s just a case of getting it down, that’s all. Which will happen when it so wishes I do so.

In the meantime, if you are an author, I hope this post has given you a better sense of perspective – or you’ll at least give it a thought when it just isn’t happening for you.

Thanks for reading.

Chris,

Your literary, theatrical friend

18 thoughts on “do flies fly, do ducks duck – do muses muse? an authorial guide to an authorial myth…

  1. I’ve never had writer’s block. Had the exhaustion though and emotional stuff to interfere with the writing. So I think you’re right on with that. And I’ve purchased Nancy Boy and am eager to read it. I’ll leave a review when I’m finished!

    • Oh, bless you Theresa, thank you ! 😊

      Nancy Boy’s quite different from Wood, Talc, much more introspective…

      And yes, emotional stuff to interfere with the writing, know all about that. Suppose that’s writing inspiration in itself, in time…

  2. So true, Chris. You can’t force “it”. “It” tells you when to put pen to paper. Creative thoughts and stories brew in the background until ready to come forth. Then and only then is the writer (and his/her readers) rewarded with a literary brilliant performance.

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