author gets the all-clear! pity he can’t say the same for Phillip Rowlings…

For any fans of my literary invention, The Rowlings Years I know you’re out there; you may not be great in number, but then nor should you be. Blessèd be the few, and all that!

Anyhow, the good news is that I, your author, have had an epiphany, concerning said series, which happened right here, where I’m sitting, just this morning – and it didn’t hurt a bit. Of course, I can’t speak for Phillip Rowlings. In fact, I do think it’s about time I put him back through his paces, in the old interview room – it must be three years since I last did so, around the time of his first outing in Wood, Talc and Mr. J: We never had it so good… And as you should know, things have moved on quite a bit since then; indeed, a whole decade and a half, with Phillip maybe non-the-wiser – re-the meaning of life and such, that is, which does tend to bog him down at times…

Hey, and here’s another idea: why don’t I get you, dear reader(s), to put him through his paces? I’m sure you’d come up with far more pertinent questions that I could at present.

Do take time to think about it.

And so to the epiphany, whether good news or bad.

Around the time of writing my debut novel, and falling head over heels for a large portion of its characters – not forgetting how it conjured up memories of my own from those heady days – I would often contemplate a prequel; that’s to say, a book in which we might meet all those characters once more, in a younger form. A prepubescent Phillip and Jed, can you imagine? Fumbling their way along amid whirlpools of filched cigarettes and Tamla Motown…

Well, this idea comprises at least part of this morning’s epiphany, in that I’m most definitely going along with the project. I’m far from sure about the details, like narrative voice and co – though I have given thought to Jed being narrator – but I can promise it will be very different from Wood, Talc and Mr. J: We never had it so good… I love a challenge and will never write the same book twice…

As for the other part, the part to complete the epiphany, I’d just like to inform you that my offerings with regard to sequels, sequels to Nancy Boy; for one year only, book 2 in the series, they’ll arrive via the form of three novellas:

Book 3 will be called The All-clearalong with some half-witty tag or other, no doubt; I’m never one for making things easy on myself. Ironic, going by that title, don’t you think?

Book 4: The Battle of Hastingsthis story, according to Phillip, being the more important version.

And book 5: The Advent of Slags on Fire – a title for which I genuinely and humbly apologise. And will endeavour to make up for it via the content.

Regarding times of publication, book 3 shouldn’t be long now… 

So, there you have it. And I do hope, for you happy – discerning – few, that this is good news. For I once again look forward to, and relish in, being you literary servant. Therefore, look out for future posts in which I’ll both go into more detail and keep you updated regarding progress made.

Thanks for reading.

Chris,

 

Your literary, theatrical friend

‘Should I arrest ‘im, inspector? ‘E ‘as got beady eyes!’ A review of Alan Hardy’s novel The Mystery of The Disappearing Corpses…

The Case Of The Disappearing Corpses: Inspector Cullot Mystery Series Book 3The Case Of The Disappearing Corpses: Inspector Cullot Mystery Series Book 3 by Alan Hardy
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Thanks for the exercise in hilarity, a well deserved five stars !

I think it safe to say that I haven’t read any mystery so complicated by Conan-Doyle or Pope. But then I can also safely say that theirs are not so farcical either.

This is the first of a collection I happen to have read by the author, one who, quite clearly, has been influenced by many of the old greats to have marked me down the years too: namely, the Ealing Comedies…

Firstly, we have Inspector Cullot. I love the French touch, especially given he happens to own a fetish for ladies’ underwear, but we’ll allow him that – he is, after all, possibly the world’s greatest detector of crime, and possibly of all time; and if you don’t believe me, ask blundering PC Blunt, and they don’t get much blunter that him! A bit of a throwback is Blunt, to Basil Rathbone’s Watson, played by Nigel Bruce – or do I mean the blundering idiot of said films, Inspector Lestrard? Or maybe ask the somewhat more competent, if impotent, Watkins – I say impotent but only when dealing with Cullot’s young and more reliable Barbara Windsor-esque kick-in-your-face daughter, Stephanie – thank God she’s on this team of fallible four!

But of course things always turn out right in the end…

As I state in each of my reviews, I will never give anything away, but what I would like to say is this: if you’re after an easy, furiously fast and funny read, then this book – no doubt this series – is for you!

I’ve already likened the book to the style of Ealing Comedy – Watkins, a young George Cole, perhaps; Blunt, Trinder? Formby? Sid James? Stephanie is positively St Trinian.

And as for Cullot himself? Will Hay every time for me.

One last thing, were you to extract the book’s witty dialogue – indeed, the dialogue – you’d be left with only a fifth of the book. And for that reason you can’t help but race along with it. All credit, then, to the author, because I myself know how difficult it is to produce flowing dialogue without it at times losing itself, and therefore the reader.

It’s thanks to the amount of dialogue, and the author’s skill and dexterity in applying it, that I not only visualised the book in film, but in the theatre as well, each scene as visual as it is humorous.

What a good old fashion romp – Bravo, Alan Hardy !

Chris,

your literary, theatrical friend

do flies fly, do ducks duck – do muses muse? an authorial guide to an authorial myth…

Hello again, and welcome (back).

I was going to write a piece about smoking for this post, given that cigarettes play something of a prominent role both in my debut novel, Wood, Talc and Mr. J: We never had it so good, and its sequel, Nancy Boy: for one year only…

… but then I wasn’t quite sure what I wanted to say about them, about cigarettes, at least this time around, other than the fact they’re bad for you, and you possibly know that already…

And so, this time around, I’d simply like to offer my opinion on that old authors’ bugaboo: ‘writers’ block’ – I can already hear you: ‘’Been done! Boring. The irony: Chris is writing about writers’ block because he’s totally uninspired – Tell us something about cigarettes!’

And you may well be right. For, at the end of the day, all I would like to say about it – well, there’s a clue in the above paragraph, where you’ll notice I placed my first mention of the ‘ailment’ in inverted commas, as I’ve just done again, there, with ‘ailment’. Why? Because there’s no such thing as ‘writers’ block’, but a mere whim amongst authors, an attention seeker – How I suffer for my art! I was a genius, and now I’m a fraud!

Thank God, then, for writers’ block! The ignorant masses – you know, the non-authors out there – those doing real work, they buy it, ’works like a charm.

And so it goes, as somebody once said.

‘What, then, Chris, might we attribute to the state of being uninspired?’

In a word: fatigue. In another: tiredness. In another – okay, I’ll make it two: mental exhaustion.

Prescription: go and do something else – a change is as good as a rest!

‘And for how long?’

As long as required – how long is a piece of string?

Writing is a consequence  the byproduct, you might say – of a head-full of knowledge, which is subconsciously working away, formulating your art, whilst ever you, the author, are engaged in other activities, like taking your kids to school, playing badminton on Thursday, and on, each activity fuelling the mind with creativity… save that, on some days, attempting to force it out , the creative process, before it’s ripe, can have the adverse effect…

No, I won’t go on, but to say that this has been my experience since I’ve been ‘putting pen to paper’, particularly with the above novels.

The sequel to the sequel, incidentally, is making progress: The All-clear: an anti-romance novella  – the third in the Rowlings Years series. And my policy of taking a break when it isn’t there is working a treat.

But here’s what inspired this post, thus confirming my philosophy, you may want to call it: earlier today, again basking in a week away from the ‘pen’, I was lying in the bath whilst my beautiful other half sat on the side of it. We were chatting, about how we arrived where we are today, and via many an adventure, I’m very happy to say – I wouldn’t have had it any other way; did you know that swords actually evolve into pens if you survive? Anyhow, what evolved from this conversation was my mental formulation of the fourth book in the Rowlings Years series: Two Big Bags and a Guitar…

How about that!

It’s just a case of getting it down, that’s all. Which will happen when it so wishes I do so.

In the meantime, if you are an author, I hope this post has given you a better sense of perspective – or you’ll at least give it a thought when it just isn’t happening for you.

Thanks for reading.

Chris,

Your literary, theatrical friend

in love with the alien (curiouser & curiouser); my review of Deb Cassidy’s The Plucker…

The Plucker: From the World of Spilt Milk by D K Cassidy
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Curiouser and curiouser; plucky author, plucky book!

I think we’ve all heard the phrase that there’s no such thing as a normal family, only those you haven’t met yet. Or: Normal? It’s a cycle on a washing machine, isn’t it?

I couldn’t resist reviewing this book in order that I might use those two lines. Because nothing exemplifies the idea – that we’re all kind of weird, in our own way – than the books I’ve read to date by D K Cassidy. That being said, she’s difficult to review without giving anything away – which I will not do, and state as much in all my reviews.

But let me tell you about the book’s disturbingly hilarious qualities, because, for black comedy, this is a true gem.

Firstly, I found myself cringing for most of the characters concerned, thanks to the author’s wonderfully adept method of drawing the reader to centre-stage, by way of her pithy and at times repetitive phraseology – repetitive use of proper nouns, for example; again, we have one of those books, written in 3rd person, and yet which leaves you feeling as though you’ve read it in 1st. But then do we? Because we’re able to discern how the protagonist must come across to those other characters – I must point out here, too, that I didn’t cringe for those reasons alone, but for a personal, more physical one. But like I said, I’m giving nothing away…

Then let’s think about the ‘alien’ the author’s provided us with. An intelligent alien, an astute alien, particularly with regard to her own ‘failings’ – or what society recognises as failings, and so she must too. Call her Pria – that’s P R I A, in case you’re wondering, an unusual name, but then it matches her different shade of skin. And what are we left with? A page turner, whereby we turn each page with only the one eye open; Pria’s essence so being that, while she may differ from the rest of us, we can’t help finding a little bit of ourselves in her at the same time.

Thought provoking, I guess the description is, whereby the author presents us with no more than what some might view as mundane – sorry, no vampires, no bare-chested cowboys, no time travelling knights. Just someone a little different… who, I might add, IS capable of bringing about the ‘paranormal’. Or is that just in her head?

Whatever the case, we’re all supposed to be on the ‘…’ spectrum somewhere. Aren’t we?

Bravo, D K Cassidy, I’ve not only learned two new words describing skin conditions, but these truly are the kinds of books I like to read!

Chris,

your literary, theatrical friend

A “Quixotic quest for life’s meaning and purpose, and love” – an extraordinarily intelligent review…

Little over a month ago, with Christmas very much upon us, I was talking with a couple of friends about how, as an author, it feels to consider that, upon the morning in question, December 25th – why I can hear the tune as I write:  ‘December 25th, December 25th! ‘ You know, from the musical production of Scrooge, starring Albert Finney? Anyhow, I was saying that it gave me a warm feeling to know that, while we’re all opening our presents, there are people out there, around about the same time, depending on time-zones and such, unwrapping one of my books – title, author: ‘Chris Rose; looks interesting, must read that, thank you so much!’

It sort of makes it all worthwhile.

Something else, to make it worthwhile, is when an author receives such a review as I’ve had the pleasure to do of late. The kind of review that just keeps coming back, overwhelmingly, whereby, whatever may be happening out there in the big bad world, all is good within, for however long – and yes, cliché I know, but it really does make it all worthwhile.

That is, when an author receives a review demonstrating a truly intelligent reading.

Well, not only have I been lucky enough of late to receive such, for Wood, Talc and Mr. J: We never had it so good…, but it’s cleverly thematic in its praise to boot.

And so I thought I’d share it with you.

Enjoy!

“What a meandering, mesmerizing journey this novel is. It’s poetry in motion, pause and read-again worthy. “Wood, Talc & Mr. J” is unique yet familiar. There’s elegance in its grit, morality in its liberation, pathos in its humor, discipline in its anarchy. It’s confident in its vision whether depicting raw reality or taking off on flights of fancy. This is storytelling in black and white yet vividly descriptive, rollicking and reflective, street-wise with the mark of fine literature in its layered narrative and smart, nimble use of language and form. Its chapters grow out of quotes from ancient Chinese wisdom and classical writers like Blake, Dickens, Stevenson, Shakespeare, Shelly, and Wilde in order to, as Mr. Rose states in the foreword, “play with themes eternal”.

“”Wood, Talc & Mr. J” IS playful, even picaresque. It’s episodic, at times a burlesque rendition of a quixotic quest for life’s meaning and purpose, and love. Like a young Don Quixote, its protagonist Phillip enjoys the ride and the fascinating, challenging, at times farcical characters and situations he meets along the way. He pursues adventure like Don Quixote did “flailing at windmills” and exalting the objects of his desire. Yet, also like Cervantes’ fiction, Mr. Rose’s novel seriously connects to the conflicted, complicated, chaotic human experience of wondering, doubting, rebelling—and searching, especially for what may never be found.

“For me the Britishness of this novel is a bonus to its brilliance and a great part of its charm. I lived in England during the 1970s and 80s, so the settings, cultural and political issues, values, humor and anecdotes are familiar and nostalgic. It’s also reminiscent of my favorite films of the “angry young men” “Look Back in Anger” era of British cinema, so I was prone to envisioning actors like Alan Bates, Albert Finney, Richard Harris and Peter O’Toole slipping into the fascinating roles of working class people that enliven this novel.

“Despite the wanderlust and internal isolation of this novel’s main character, there is such a feeling of hearth and home (a definite place to set out from and return to), with the importance of family and friendship at its core. The historical context is vividly conveyed through characterizations, settings, and current events, and, most essentially, the pop and jazz music playing on the juke box, turntable, radio, or even just in Phillip’s head.

“From its opening lines to its last, “Wood, Talc & Mr. J” is challenging, intelligent, out of the ordinary and beautifully written, full of adventure, lively conversations, compelling action, laughter and tears, an imaginative memoir of past times, people and places Mr. Rose honestly and cleverly transforms into something unforgettable for his readers, too.!”

DM Denton.

* * * * *

Wow ! Here’s a link to a chapter, if you should so wish >>>>>> LINK

Thanks for stopping by, and enjoy.

Chris,

Your literary, theatrical friend